We are in the process of upgrading software and the SDN website will be temporarily unavailable for a few hours on Monday morning EST. Once the software is upgraded, this notice will no longer appear and the site will be back to normal. We apologize for any inconvenience.
  • Image 1 of 6

"We prefer to die in prison fighting for the land, rather than starving".

Richard Juilliart | Uganda

A man sentenced to prison life for killing his neighbor who wanted to take his land. "We prefer to die in prison fighting for the land, rather than starving".
Land is not only one of the most important resources, but it is also a means to the realisation of many human rights such as the right to food, the right to life and the right to adequate housing, among others.
©Richard Juilliart

In Uganda, land conflicts, or land wrangles, as they are popularly referred to in the country, have erupted in recent years with a cataclysmic effect, reverberating throughout the countryside, towns, and Kampala, the capital city. Depending on the region, anywhere from 33 to 85 percent of the population has dealt with a land dispute or felt their tenure rights threatenedThe majority of all criminal cases in the statutory courts have some relation to land, including cases of murder, assault, and domestic violence . Of course, there are differences throughout the country with respect to the immediate drivers of land conflicts.The intensification of conflicts over land emerged when people first began resettling the southern areas of the region in the early 1990s. The returnees had initially been displaced in the late 1980s because of civil war and large-scale cattle rustling. The disputes centered on disagreements over plot boundaries and cases of “squatters,” who were accused of resettling on someone else’s land. Another cycle of displacement occurred in northwestern Teso in 2003 with the infiltration of an Acholi-based insurgent group, the Lord’s Resistance Army 

 

©RichardJuilliart

"We prefer to die in prison fighting for the land, rather than starving".

 

In Uganda, land conflicts, or “land wrangles,” as they are popularly referred to in the

country, have erupted in recent years with a cataclysmic effect, reverberating throughout the countryside, towns, and Kampala, the capital city. Depending on the region, anywhere from 33 to 85 percent of the population has dealt with a land dispute or felt their tenure rights threatened

The majority of all criminal cases in the statutory courts have some relation to land, including cases of murder, assault, and domestic violence . Of course, there are differences throughout the country with respect to the immediate drivers of land conflicts

In Teso , the intensification of conflicts over land emerged when people first began resettling the southern areas of the region in the early 1990s. The returnees had initially been displaced in the late 1980s because of civil war and large-scale cattle rustling. The disputes centered on disagreements over plot boundaries and cases of “squatters,” who were accused of resettling on someone else’s land. Another cycle of displacement occurred in northwestern Teso in 2003 with the infiltration of an Acholi-based insurgent group, the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA).

Where conflict was once defined by armed violence and large-scale cattle raids, contemporary conflict is driven by pressures on key resources and a shifting political ecology. people consistently described how increasing climatic variability and unpredictability have resulted in theft, small-scale clashes over key resources, and even intrahousehold violence.

www.richardjuilliart.com

Content loading...

Make Comment/View Comments