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Ukraine-The Human Cost of War.

Richard Juilliart | Ukraine

Single mother of three from Kramatorsk. She lives in a refugee shelter in Kiev.
“I’m a single mother. I have three children and I come from the city of Kramatorsk. I fled the city during the fighting and today I live in this social centre, but I have to leave because after three months we have to make room for new refugees. I share a dorm room with two other families. I don’t know what I’ll become and I’m afraid of ending up on the streets with my three children.”
© Richard Juilliart

Ukraine-The Human Cost of War.

For six years, people in Donbass, Ukraine have been living in fear. Fear of the physical violence caused by the conflict surrounding them. Fear about whether or not they will earn enough money or be able to access pensions to support themselves. Fear of living close to the ‘contact line’, which is littered with landmines and other explosives. And now, fear of a virus that has wreaked havoc on the world and threatens to intensify all the challenges associated with a humanitarian crisis.

More than10,000civilians have beenkilled or injuredand1.4 millionpeople have been registered asinternally displacedas a result of Europe’s deadliest conflict in the past two decades. Already enduring so much, the COVID-19 pandemic has only intensified the challenges faced by people living in this conflict-affected part of Ukraine. Some3.4 million peopleare in need of humanitarian assistance, with that number projected to rise due to the global COVID-19 pandemic and associated economic impacts.

 

Ukraine-The Human Cost of War.

For six years, people in Donbass, Ukraine have been living in fear. Fear of the physical violence caused by the conflict surrounding them. Fear about whether or not they will earn enough money or be able to access pensions to support themselves. Fear of living close to the ‘contact line’, which is littered with landmines and other explosives. And now, fear of a virus that has wreaked havoc on the world and threatens to intensify all the challenges associated with a humanitarian crisis.

More than10,000civilians have beenkilled or injuredand1.4 millionpeople have been registered asinternally displacedas a result of Europe’s deadliest conflict in the past two decades. Already enduring so much, the COVID-19 pandemic has only intensified the challenges faced by people living in this conflict-affected part of Ukraine. Some3.4 million peopleare in need of humanitarian assistance, with that number projected to rise due to the global COVID-19 pandemic and associated economic impacts.

Despite the ongoing conflict, the humanitarian response in eastern Ukraine has been consistently underfunded for the past five years. As a result, humanitarian actors are unable to ensure that people in urgent need of assistance receive the support they require. In 2020, only 28 per cent of humanitarian funding needed for this year alone has been provided. Thehumanitarian community urgently needs anotherUS$149 millionto respond to the humanitarian and health crises and support vulnerable people living in conflict-affected areas.

www.richardjuilliart.com

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