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Economic misery engulfs Syrian refugees and their hosts.

Richard Juilliart | Lebanon

Saida-Lebanon.
View inside a Shelter.
the Lebanese government will not allow traditional refugee camps in Lebanon, refugees are finding unusual places to live across the country, including unfinished homes, abandoned shopping malls and schools ……
©Richard Juilliart

In Lebanon, the capacity of local community and Syrian refugees to provide mutual support is being stretched to breaking point by economic turmoil and the COVID-19 crisis.

Lebanon is currently home to 892,000 registered Syrian refugees, and has the highest per capita population of refugees in the world. According to the most recent assessment by UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, nine out of ten Syrian refugee families in Lebanon were living in debt even before COVID-19 exacerbated the situation, with average household debt levels of US$1,115.

As the economic slump undermines the ability of the Lebanese people to provide for themselves, it also erodes their capacity for even the smallest acts of generosity towards Syrian refugees. International support for Lebanon and humanitarian agencies is more crucial than ever to help the country and the Syrian refugees it hosts.

©RichardJuilliart

In Lebanon, the capacity of local community and Syrian refugees to provide mutual support is being stretched to breaking point by economic turmoil and the COVID-19 crisis.

Lebanon is currently home to 892,000 registered Syrian refugees, and has the highest per capita population of refugees in the world. According to the most recent assessment by UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, nine out of ten Syrian refugee families in Lebanon were living in debt even before COVID-19 exacerbated the situation, with average household debt levels of US$1,115.

As the economic slump undermines the ability of the Lebanese people to provide for themselves, it also erodes their capacity for even the smallest acts of generosity towards Syrian refugees. International support for Lebanon and humanitarian agencies is more crucial than ever to help the country and the Syrian refugees it hosts.

www.richardjuilliart.com

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