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On the Road to Chernihiv

Maranie Staab | Ukraine

A woman walks past a destroyed tank in Chernihiv, Ukraine on April 6, 2022.

These photos document a 750 mile trip I took on April 5-8 with Team Humanity, from my base of operations in Chisinau (the Moldovan capital) to Chernihiv, Ukraine (100 miles north of Kyiv) to deliver medical supplies and evacuate civilians to safety in Moldova.

I departed Chisinau with Team Humanity early on the morning of April 5, 2022 with several buses full of medical equipment, medication, diapers, non-perishable food items and more. The objective of the mission was to deliver supplies to Odessa, Kyiv and Chernihiv and to then evacuate people from Chernihiv and Mykolaiv.

More than 70% of the city of Chernihiv has been heavily damaged or destroyed in its entirety. Crushed and burned out vehicles litter roadways, piles of wood and rubble are seen where buildings once stood and much of the city center is completely destroyed.

Click link below, "On the Road to Chernihiv" for a longer description of the trip including observations in the towns we visited.

Please support ongoing evacuation efforts by donating to Team Humanity

These photos document a 750 mile trip I took on April 5-8 with Team Humanity, from my base of operations in Chisinau (the Moldovan capital) to Chernihiv, Ukraine (100 miles north of Kyiv) to deliver medical supplies and evacuate civilians to safety in Moldova.

I departed Chisinau with Team Humanity early on the morning of April 5, 2022 with several buses full of medical equipment, medication, diapers, non-perishable food items and more. The objective of the mission was to deliver supplies to Odessa, Kyiv and Chernihiv and to then evacuate people from Chernihiv and Mykolaiv.

The trip took almost exactly three days. We met around 3:00 am early on the morning of the 5th to load the buses full of supplies and arrived back in Chisinau around 2:00 am late on the 7th. By the time the 200 people who had been evacuated were settled in a shelter, it was nearing 3:00 am.

Depending upon where we were, the route looked different. In Odessa, there is a juxtaposition between some semblance of regular life actives (people shopping, cafes and stores open) and street corners piled with tires and sandbags and a visible military presence. Some people are choosing to leave Odessa while others have, at this time, opted to remain in the city. In Kyiv some parts of the city have started to reopen and people are beginning to return, but large roadblocks and checkpoints disrupt traffic throughout.There is a citywide curfew from 9:00 pm to 6:00 am; after this hour all stores and petrol stations are closed and the roads are near empty. On one occasion we had a police escort for the last hour of our trip as we had been delayed and were on the road past 9:00 am.

Further north, as we ventured outside of the Kyiv city center, the checkpoints and roadblocks increased in frequency. The buses stopped at each of these and we were all required to show passports and I was required to show a Ukrainian press accreditation. Numerous roadways and a bridge along the way were visibly damaged, we drove by the remains of a missile, its end still sticking out of the ground, and for several miles just outside of Chernihiv, the side of the roadway was dotted with warning signs that simply read, “Mines!”

More than 70% of the city of Chernihiv has been heavily damaged or destroyed in its entirety. Crushed and burned out vehicles litter roadways, piles of wood and rubble are seen where buildings once stood and much of the city center is completely destroyed.

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